USA

‘Unsellable Houses’ Season Finale Provides Hope That the U.S. Housing Market Is Finally Turning Around – Realtor.com News

4 minutes, 52 seconds Read

All throughout this season of HGTV’s “Unsellable Houses,” Leslie Davis and Lyndsay Lamb have been challenged by what they describe as an “unpredictable” housing market. Yet the twin sisters finally get a surprisingly positive outcome for the renovation they complete on the Season 4 finale, fetching an offer well over the asking price!

In the episode “Impossible Expectations,” Davis and Lamb pair up with Jamie and Amy, a brother and sister who recently inherited a four-bedroom, three-bathroom home in Woodinville, WA, from their father.


Buy/sell, rent/lease residential &
commercials real estate properties.

The siblings explain that their dad died before he could complete the renovations he had long hoped for, and they express that they want to see those plans through before selling the place. The 1970s-style house has a current value of about $680,000.

Davis admits she’s touched by their sentimentality, but she stays grounded in reality and wants to invest only in areas that are the most worthy of returns.

“We want to honor their dad, I know they want to honor their dad, but we can’t lose money honoring their dad,” she explains.

The sisters put up $130,000 and get to work on some high-ROI changes that ultimately attract a buyer who overbids. Read on to learn the upgrades sellers should make to their homes to bring in more money.

Redo a run-down exterior

Jamie and Amy's dad's house is in desperate need of an exterior makeover.
Jamie and Amy’s dad’s house is in desperate need of an exterior makeover.

(HGTV)

The house is located in one of Woodinville’s most sought-after neighborhoods, but its exterior leaves much to be desired, with peeling paint and warped shingles creating an eyesore.

The twins assign nearly one-third of their budget—$42,000—to paint and redo the roof, garage doors, gutters, stairs, and siding.

Leslie Davis and Lyndsay Lamb dump big bucks into improving the curb appeal of this home on “Unsellable Houses.”

(HGTV)

While it’s “one of the biggest transformations” they’ve ever done, investing in the home’s curb appeal pays off when they hold a successful open house

“It’s a lot of money that’s going into the exterior, but nobody would have walked through those front doors if that exterior stayed the same,” says Lamb.

Save money by working around existing systems

The existing layout of this 1970s-style home is too tight and choppy for modern tastes.The existing layout of this 1970s-style home is too tight and choppy for modern tastes.
The existing layout of this 1970s-style home is too tight and choppy for modern tastes.

(HGTV)

Inside, Davis and Lamb consider their options for fixing tight quarters in two important areas: the kitchen and the primary suite.

When they find out it could cost $30,000 just to move the electrical and plumbing systems for one wall, they decide to concentrate on what they can do cosmetically in order to cut down on construction costs.

“If we started moving walls, plumbing, electrical, we could blow a huge budget,” Lamb explains.

Widening one doorway without demolishing a wall solves the space issue and saves money.Widening one doorway without demolishing a wall solves the space issue and saves money.
Widening one doorway without demolishing a wall solves the space issue and saves money.

(HGTV)

They widen a doorway instead of opening up a wall, then swap outdated appliances for modern ones, while keeping them in their original location. Those choices allow the sisters to address tricky layout issues while also staying on budget.

Design with the local demographic in mind

The existing kitchen finishes are too outdated for buyers looking in this high-end neighborhood.The existing kitchen finishes are too outdated for buyers looking in this high-end neighborhood.
The existing kitchen finishes are too outdated for buyers looking in this high-end neighborhood.

(HGTV)

The cosmetic changes in the kitchen are also an example of how Davis and Lamb make design choices based on what buyers in that specific neighborhood want in a high-end home.

“Buyers expect a lot in this price point,” Davis points out. The sisters opt for a honed leather finish on the quartz countertop and textured floor and backsplash tiles.

A quartz countertop and luxury tile backsplash instantly elevate this kitchen.A quartz countertop and luxury tile backsplash instantly elevate this kitchen.
A quartz countertop and luxury tile backsplash instantly elevate this kitchen.

(HGTV)

A little midcentury modern goes a long way

Davis and Lamb decided early on to embrace the midcentury modern vibes of the home.Davis and Lamb decided early on to embrace the midcentury modern vibes of the home.
Davis and Lamb decided early on to embrace the midcentury modern aesthetic of the home.

(HGTV)

Davis and Lamb also take the home’s style into consideration when it comes to staging and decor.

The sisters agree on an aesthetic they call “midcentury modern with a twist.”

“But we don’t want to go hardcore into that because we are in somewhat of a traditional area,” Lamb cautions.

Green and orange accent pieces play up the midcentury modern aesthetic of the home without overpowering the design.Green and orange accent pieces play up the midcentury modern aesthetic of the home without overpowering the design.
Green and orange accent pieces play up the midcentury modern aesthetic of the home without overpowering the design.

(HGTV)

Their strategy is on display in the living room, where architectural features such as the fireplace are spruced up and highlighted, with era-specific decor playing a supporting role.

“The pops of color in our living artwork pieces as well as the little splashes of orange and green throughout the home definitely add to that midcentury modern, but we’re not going extreme,” Lamb says.

Pop in some plants

A privacy screen on the home's deck serves as a shelf for plants.A privacy screen on the home's deck serves as a shelf for plants.
A privacy screen on the home’s deck serves as a shelf for plants.

(HGTV)

From those living artwork pieces made out of moss to the potted plants Davis and Lamb select for the space, greenery plays a big part in the final staging of this home.

Plants are strategically used inside as well as outside on the deck’s custom privacy screen, which doubles as a plant shelf.

The sisters make clear that staged homes sell 90% faster than unstaged ones, so it’s a no-brainer to place a few plants around a space that’s up for sale.

How does this unsellable house turn out?

The twins’ healthy $130,000 renovation budget pays off handsomely. Davis and Lamb confidently list the home for $999,750, but they are blown away by the response.

“Finally, a purchase price that was amazing,” says Davis.

Davis and Lamb are thrilled with an offer that is over the asking price.Davis and Lamb are thrilled with an offer that is over the asking price.
Davis and Lamb are thrilled with an offer that is over the asking price.

(HGTV)

With an offer of $1,175,000, the sisters are able to be reimbursed, plus turn a profit of $365,000 to split with Jamie and Amy. That works out to $182,500 for each pair.

For both sets of siblings, the sale of this previously unsellable house signals the start of a new chapter.

“There’s a little light on our market again,” Lamb says.

This post was originally published on 3rd party site mentioned on the title of this site

Similar Posts

X
0
    0
    Your Interest
    Your Interest List is emptyReturn to Buying
    ×